Writeside.net [payal dhar's cyber den]

« Switched at birth | More Satin reviews »

There’s a Ghost in My PC

30 July 2011
Posted in: Writing | 3 Comments

Never fear, it’s not MacBeth that is haunted (and she doesn’t like being called a PC). There’s a Ghost in My PC is the title of a work in progress for Scholastic. Here’s what happens:

It’s a catastrophe—Madhu is about to turn 13 and her mother wants to buy her a new computer!

Oh yes, you read right, a brand new shiny computer. But for Madhu, a new PC equals a full-scale disaster. Unknown to anyone else, Madhu’s battered second-hand laptop is very, very special indeed. It can get online without an Internet connection; no virus will ever dare to enter it; and the software keeps itself updated. Oh, and it has an erratic sense of humour and is in the habit of having long and frequent conversations with Madhu.

For between the motherboard and the megabytes resides Viru—the ghost of her dead neighbour—and Madhu’s best friend. What will happen to Viru if she gets a new computer?

What with coming up with a plan to save Viru, reconciling Cousin Kavitha with her mother, and finding out what Amma’s new friend from work is really up to—is it any wonder that Madhu can hardly sleep at night?

This book is based on the short story “Virus Here” from The Puffin Book of Spooky Ghost Stories (Puffin, 2009), and takes place two years after Madhu comes into possession of her haunted PC.

~PD

3 Responses

  1. Niklas says:

    Sounds fun! 😀

  2. Scott says:

    The Puffin Book of Spooky Ghost Stories – Absolutely irresponsible of Puffin books, are they teaching children that it’s Ok to have someone inside the PC talking to them? There are several viruses that will let the attacker converse with their victim and if children are taught they should be secretive about a friendly Ghost inside their PC what message are we teaching them? You’d best listen to the ghost, go meet up with him in the park but ignore your parents!?! Unbelievable!

  3. Payal says:

    Hi Scott. Yes, indeed, it would be a travesty if Puffin (and Scholastic) were to peddle such a message. But one hopes that the publishers — not to mention the author — are aware of the issues!

Leave a Reply

*